Rolling Stone: The King’s Dead, Kill the Messenger

Pop Culture

Rolling Stone’s latest issue is the most complete obituary I have seen. In a fitting issue for the time of the King of Pop’s death, the magazine encapsulates the masses — and their media — at the time of the monarch’s passing. Rolling Stone, now more than ever, is a running requiem for what pop has become — that is for another post on another day, though.

What sparked this post was reading Rolling Stone’s last published Michael Jackson article during his life. The article was a more benign version of Perez Hilton’s first article after Michael’s death (how appropriately parallel). In a nutshell, Rolling Stone highlighted the cautionary signs of Michael’s mighty comeback being another flop and failure — due to (as Perez put it) “cold feet.” However, in a  most beautifully apropos closing to this piece — and hopefully their recent shark-jump — Rolling Stone declares:

What most people agree on: This is Jackson’s last shot. As one concert-industry veteran puts it, “You can only burn people so many times before they go away.”

Life is indeed the synchronicity of chance … Rolling Stone: they the self-fulfilling prophets of pop — pop’s own Prometheus if you will. Their fire can burn a King down, and yet simultaneously keep the JoBros “Burning Up” the cover — amazing.

Watch this space: Now that Vibe’s gone, there’s not many more places you can look — but I’ll take Spin and Q before I settle for this, the once-preeminent-print-publication-now-pop-pamphlet-with-an-inverse-page-to-ego-size-correlation.

3 thoughts on “Rolling Stone: The King’s Dead, Kill the Messenger

  1. Please go back to school and learn how to write a decent article. That isn’t me being ‘mean’ either. Your writing lacks discipline and perspective. You may posses both of those but it is very obvious you do not yet know how to put them to good use. Until that time, please stop assuming, as so many wrongly do, that a disjointed blog post of your inner critic’s pettier side is the same thing as good journalism.

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